Substance Use Theory in the Recent Past: Modernization and the Mitchell Report

Editor’s Note:  These entries are part of an ongoing drug-related dissertation bibliography being compiled by Jonathon Erlen, which was formerly published in the Social History of Alcohol and Drugs journal but is now periodically featured on the Points blog. Contact Dr. Erlen through the link above.

It’s a Whole New Ball Game: The Mitchell Report, Performance Enhancing Drugs, and Professional Sports

Author: Schrader, Brian J.

Publication info: University of Denver, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2016.

http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1802057999?accountid=14709

Abstract: This dissertation investigates the findings of a congressional investigation into the use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) in Major League Baseball, known as the Mitchell Report. It analyzes the primary arguments presented in the report, the argument for integrity, role models, and apology specifically, through the lens of governmentality and moral regulation. It argues that the report represents a distinct mode of governance that seeks to condemn PED use in a moralizing way. This mode of governance is characterized by its emergence from a variety of locations as opposed to the relatively simple use of the state and its legal apparatus. Importantly, one of those locations includes the individual subject who is urged to self-govern without the need of external threat or recourse. The dissertation also suggests that this mode of governance is inextricably linked to rhetoric and communication.

Read more