Healing Disruption: Symposium

Dr Maziyar Ghiabi has announced the proceedings of a two-day symposium titled ‘Healing Disruption: Histories of Intoxication and ‘Addiction’. The symposium is to be held on 26th-27th January, 2023 at Reed Hall, Exeter University, UK. For more details please email m.ghiabi@exeter.ac.uk.

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Call for Papers: Contemporary Drug Problems Conference

Contemporary Drug Problems have issued a call for papers for their sixth conference on the theme of ‘Embracing trouble: New ways of being, doing and knowing’. The 2023 conference seeks submissions for presentations that engage with and trouble our own methods, tools and practices in alcohol and other drug research.

The conference will be hosted in Paris on September 6-8, 2023. Further details of the conference, including venue, registration fees and information about keynotes are forthcoming. You can also read more about previous conferences at the journal website.

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Addiction Lives Interview: Paul Roman

This post provides some excerpts from an “Addiction Lives” interview with Paul Roman, a researcher in the alcohol and addictions field for 55 years, who talks about the early years of the NIAAA. You can read the full interview here.

The “Addiction Lives” interview project is a print and online collaboration between the Society for the Study of Addiction and the journal Addiction. The series explores the views and personal experiences of people who have contributed to the evolution of ideas in the Addiction journal’s field of interest.

“Addiction Lives” is edited by Professor Virginia Berridge and this interview was conducted by Points co-founder Trysh Travis in August 2021.


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Points Interview: ‘Born addicts’ in North Africa with Nina Studer

a banner showing the SHAD journal

Today’s post features an interview with Nina Studer, a UK-based historian. Nina focuses on the history of medicine and colonial medicine in Middle East and North Africa.

Nina recently authored ‘’The native is indeed a born addict, but so far he has not yet found his true poison’: Psychiatric theories on overconsumption and race in the colonial Maghreb‘ in the upcoming Fall 2022 issue of the Social History of Alcohol and Drugs. Find out more about Nina’s background, article and future research plans in this interview.

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Drinking Studies Showcase: ‘Addictions’ with Rebecca Lemon.

Editor’s Note: This post marks the launch of our latest feature: Drinking Studies Showcase, where we spotlight the work of those within the Drinking Studies Network.

I was very privileged to sit down with Rebecca Lemon, Professor of English at the University of Southern California, to discuss her recent special issue for English Language Notes titled ‘Addictions‘ which she guest-edited.

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Points Interview: Carl Erik Fisher

Today we’re excited to feature a Points Interview with Dr. Carl Erik Fisher, the author of The Urge: Our History of Addiction (Penguin Press, 2022). Carl is an addiction psychiatrist, bioethics scholar, and author. He is an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University, where he studies and teaches law, ethics, and policy relating to psychiatry and neuroscience, especially issues related to substance use disorders and other addictive behaviors. The interview was conducted by Dr David Herzberg, Editor of the Social History of Alcohol & Drugs.

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An American Way of Working

In Methadone: An American Way of Dealing, work is everywhere. Dayton, Ohio, the film’s primary location, is introduced to us as a “manufacturing community” beset by crime. These two types of work—factory and crime—come up again and again while we are in town. Straight work, at GM, or at a foundry, leads to getting high just to bear it, to “paint over the factory,” as one young worker puts it, and get through another soul-killing shift. Staying in the plant and getting by on methadone instead is tough. We meet only one worker doing this; he is trying to taper off and not making it, missing shifts for the first time because he feels so low.  We meet many workers who have chosen to stay outside the factory, period, and stay high all the time. They claim they are living a better, more real life than their fathers did, trooping into factories every day with their coveralls and lunchboxes, “sheep” meekly accepting their slaughter.  As the film notes, with its passing shots of street preachers and sex shows, the straight life is studded with its own addictive consolations. Dayton, we are told, has “1000 bars and just one [methadone] clinic.” 

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