Conferenece Report: Cannabis Roots: The Hidden History of Marijuana

Editor’s Note: Guest Blogger Chris Bennet takes us inside the Cannabis Roots Conference held this November in Vancouver, Canada — complete with video from each session! When thinking of the history of marijuana, most people’s minds go back to the hippy era of the 60s and the pot smoking flower-children whose peace and love ideals haveContinue reading “Conferenece Report: Cannabis Roots: The Hidden History of Marijuana”

Documents: W.O.M.A.N.: “The Women’s Organization to ‘Mash’ Alcoholism and Narcotics” (1973)

Points readers who have been following my attempts– in diatribes, documents, and interviews— to map out a history of feminist responses (and non-responses) to addiction will be interested in the document transcribed below.  A tri-fold pamphlet from 1973 describing the work of W.O.M.A.N.– “the Women’s Organization to ‘Mash’ Alcoholism and Narcotics”–a grassroots organization located inContinue reading “Documents: W.O.M.A.N.: “The Women’s Organization to ‘Mash’ Alcoholism and Narcotics” (1973)”

Historical Hooters; Or, What I Did on My Summer Vacation

I didn’t expect that a trip to Alaska this past summer would become an ongoing tour of brothel museums, but it did.  Along with spectacular scenery, bountiful wildlife, and delicious food, Alaska tourism served up plenty of quirky history.  Casting prostitutes and madams of the gold rush era as heroic female entrepreneurs who purveyed bothContinue reading “Historical Hooters; Or, What I Did on My Summer Vacation”

Bottling Up Emotions?

Editor’s Note:  Does the lens of emotion bring into focus otherwise vague or unnoticed aspects of temperance campaigns?  Guest blogger Stephanie Olsen, of the recently launched Center for the History of Emotions at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, argues yes, it does. The history of emotions has become a trendy topic recently,Continue reading “Bottling Up Emotions?”

A Colombian Queen’s Tale: The End and Beginning of Griselda Blanco

Griselda Blanco, the Cocaine Godmother, was gunned down in front of a butcher shop in Medellín, Colombia on September 3, 2012.  Since her initial indictments in New York City beginning in the early 1970s, Blanco has flitted in and out of the popular imagination.  Tales of Blanco emerged first in police and court documents and newspapers.Continue reading “A Colombian Queen’s Tale: The End and Beginning of Griselda Blanco”

Feminism and Addiction– An Interview with Sandra Morgen

Editor’s Note: In my ongoing attempt to locate a Second Wave Feminist discourse on women’s substance abuse and addiction, I turned to the Women’s Health Movement– a logical place, it would seem, to find the issues conceptualized as public health problems with disproportionate effects on women and children.  How did the Women’s Health  Movement thinkContinue reading “Feminism and Addiction– An Interview with Sandra Morgen”

Feminism and Addiction– An Interview with Barabara Epstein

Editor’s Note:  In a post last spring, I laid out my interest in trying to locate feminist responses to alcohol and drug problems within the women’s liberation movement of the late 1960s-early ‘70s.  Comments of and off the blog suggested that in fact there was an obvious connection between 2nd wave feminism and drugs andContinue reading “Feminism and Addiction– An Interview with Barabara Epstein”

Feminism and Addiction– An Interview with Laura Schmidt

Editor’s Note: Laura Schmidt is Professor of Health Policy in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and the Co-Director of UCSF’s Clinical and Translational Research Institute’s (CTSI) Community Engagement and Health Policy Program.  A Phd in Sociology, she also holds Master’s degrees in Public Health and Social Welfare.  She isContinue reading “Feminism and Addiction– An Interview with Laura Schmidt”

“They Call Them Camisoles”: The Short Life and Tragic Death of Wilma Wilson

They Call Them Camisoles is a tantalizing document– Wilma Wilson’s first-person account of her 1939 commitment for alcoholism to the Camarillo State Hospital in California. Published in 1940, the book had recently been out of print.  I learned of it myself a few years ago, and discovered only yesterday that it has been republished in aContinue reading ““They Call Them Camisoles”: The Short Life and Tragic Death of Wilma Wilson”

Victorian Women on Drugs, Part 4: The Female Addicts of Deadwood

Today, Points presents the final installment of guest blogger Kristina Aikens’ four-part series on Victorian women and drugs. Today, Kristina looks at the constructed reality of drug use in the HBO series Deadwood. For my last blog post, I turn from texts actually from the nineteenth century to a story created in the twenty-first century butContinue reading “Victorian Women on Drugs, Part 4: The Female Addicts of Deadwood”

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