Reckoning with Anslinger, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Gore File

Editor’s Note: This week, Bob Beach continues his discussion of evidence in the archives. This essay is based on his recent trip to the Harry J. Anslinger Papers at Penn State University. I know he was simply doing his job, but it was a strange experience. This was not my first archive trip. But whenContinue reading “Reckoning with Anslinger, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Gore File”

Parallel to the Grain? Finding Recreational Users in the Archives

For cultural historians looking into the history of drugs, one of the more frustrating obstacles to our work comes from trying to find “the people,” those who used the drugs we are studying. In studies of more recent times, scholars are able to locate individuals, interviewing them about their experiences. But for someone who studiesContinue reading “Parallel to the Grain? Finding Recreational Users in the Archives”

Has LSD Matured? The Return of Psychedelic R&D

Editor’s Note: This post was written by Lucas Richert and Erika Dyck, and was originally published on The 2×2 Project, an online journal from Columbia University’s Department of Epidemiology. In February 2014, Scientific American surprised readers with an editorial that called for an end to the ban on psychedelic drug research and criticized drug regulators forContinue reading “Has LSD Matured? The Return of Psychedelic R&D”

Revising Drug History on the Web (or, what’s up with Vincent Dole’s Wikipedia page?)

When I taught high school a little less than a decade ago, we teachers generally regarded Wikipedia as a kind of academic quackery. The site supposedly lured our stressed, overscheduled prep students by allowing them to tap an up-to-date—but intellectually suspect— knowledge base with just a few keystrokes. Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger launched theContinue reading “Revising Drug History on the Web (or, what’s up with Vincent Dole’s Wikipedia page?)”

Cultural Histories of Substance Abuse and E-History: Creating an International Multilingual Research Network

E-Humanities and E-History, the digitization of historical data and the development of text and sentiment mining tools to explore these data, bring new challenges and possibilities for research into the developing field of the history of alcohol and drugs. More in particular, E-History – when combined with more traditional historical methods – can stimulate andContinue reading “Cultural Histories of Substance Abuse and E-History: Creating an International Multilingual Research Network”

Complete Quarterly Journal of Inebriety (1876-1914) Now Available Online

Editor’s note: This is an exciting development for researchers in addiction history and a welcome contribution from Weiner and White. After more than a decade of persistent searching and meticulous collecting, a team led by historian William L. White and Hazelden Library Manager Barbara Weiner has acquired and digitized all 141 issues of the QuarterlyContinue reading “Complete Quarterly Journal of Inebriety (1876-1914) Now Available Online”

Collier’s 1943 Snapshot of the First Yale Summer School of Alcohol Studies

Note: Readers are encouraged to send potential leads, sources, or thoughts relating to E.M. Jellinek’s life to Judit Ward, at jhajnal@rci.rutgers.edu, or Ron Roizen, at ronroizen@frontier.com.  With thanks in advance, from both of us. “IF YOU saw an Anti-Saloon Leaguer shake the hand of a saloonkeeper,” wrote Amy Porter in the October 30, 1943 issueContinue reading “Collier’s 1943 Snapshot of the First Yale Summer School of Alcohol Studies”

Setting the Record Straight, Part 5: A Disease They Didn’t Have

Editor’s note: Today marks the final installment of guest blogger Marcus Chatfield’s eye-opening exploration of the role that peer-reviewed research played in facilitating the survival of Straight Inc. into the 1990s, as well as its ongoing legacy in coercive youth drug abuse treatment. In the 1989 Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment article “Outcome of a UniqueContinue reading “Setting the Record Straight, Part 5: A Disease They Didn’t Have”

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